Places and Travel

So we went to the sea

The view from the veranda of the condo we rented.

The view from the veranda of the condo we rented. The dock belongs to the UNAM fisheries research station that was next door.

It’s not that life is all that hard (for us) in Mexico City, but some of its consistencies do become tiring. So we took eight days in January and went to the Caribbean coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, to Puerto Morelos specifically. I made the odd discovery that I don’t always need a café for creative stimulation; when I was not simply staring at the view above, I found that my brain filled with ideas, and I came up with a grand solution to the problem in my current work, called “Erasing Rose,” that allowed me to finally move ahead from where I was stalled for a long time. Maybe relaxing is a good idea, although it is not one of my habits.

Puerto Morelos is a very small fishing village (with some tourists — most of whom seemed to be Mexicans from the area), on the coast a ways south of Cancun and a ways north of Playa del Carmen, both of which are far from being fishing villages these days and are packed to overflowing with tourists; maybe only tourists. We rented a nice condo — four levels with an apartment on each level, and we were on the bottom so could walk right out the door and onto that pure white flour-like sand. (If you’re interested in how to find such a beach condo in Puerto Morelos, we found this one on a website called Vrbo.)

This is the condo seen from the water's edge; we were on the bottom.

This is the condo seen from the water’s edge; we were on the bottom.

We chose it partly because it was not in the village, and also the price was right (half or more of a hotel room, and we had three bedrooms and two baths). It was two kilometers north of the village center. We did not rent a car, so to get to the village with its restaurants and food shopping opportunities, we walked the beach. It took about 20-25 minutes, and the soft sand was fine exercise, although using new muscles required a masssage. Being away from the village and the big resorts — one of them for swinging nudists, and that was quite a show during our walks — it was quiet. The only sound we ever heard at night was the distant crashing of the surf a hundred meters or so off the shoreline, where it broke on the reef, the same reef so popular with divers in Belize to the south.

The white line at the horizon is the reef. Waves at the shoreline were more like water lapping at the edge of a lake.

The white line at the horizon is the reef. Waves at the shoreline were more like water lapping at the edge of a lake. Snorkeling trips to the reef were a popular activity.

Like this all the way from the veranda to the shoreline.

Like this all the way from the veranda to the shoreline.

Following are a few more photos from the holiday.

A beached whale trapped in the sand in front of the nudie sex resort, which I've forgotten the name of.

A beached whale trapped in the sand in front of the nudie sex resort, which I’ve forgotten the name of. A sign on the lifeguard tower warned against “sexual intercourse” on the beach there.

Sunburned buns ... ouch!

Sunburned buns … ouch!

Skin to die for, as they say.

Skin tone to die for, as they say.

On the walk along the beach into Puerto Morelos, ahead.

On the walk along the beach into Puerto Morelos, ahead. The day we arrived, just after a storm. That’s me in the cool hat.

The only "supermarket" in town, but it covered the necessities for a holiday.

The only “supermarket” in town, but it covered the necessities for a holiday, including a decent selection of wine.

 

Harp? On the beach? At least it wasn't more mariachis.

Harp? On the beach? At least it wasn’t more mariachis.

 

Wasting away again in you know where.

Wasting away again in you know where.

It has long been my notion that all living species -- fish, fowl, and animal -- are usually more humane than humans. Here, an albatross maintains guard over a suck or injured friend or mate, and you better not get too close.

It has long been my notion that all living species — fish, fowl, and animal — are usually more humane than humans. Here, an albatross maintains guard over a sick or injured friend or mate, and you better not get too close.

Sunrise, the last morning, seen from our veranda.

Sunrise, the last morning, seen from our veranda.

And here’s an interesting titbit to close with. We took Interjet back to Mexico City from the Cancun airport — and Interjet is now our favorite Mexican airline — and one of the new features of this aircraft was outside video, showing the view from the cockpit. So we got to see what takeoff looked like from the pilot’s POV (it’s way fast), and then the approach into Mexico City. Here is what it looks like on final approach into Mexico City, from the pilot’s POV.

The final approach into the Mexico City International Airport. That's smog, not a dirty video screen.

The final approach into the Mexico City International Airport. That’s smog, not a dirty video screen.

During this trip, we also visited to ancient Mayan sites: Cobu and Tulum. I’ll put up a few photos of that in a future post. Hope you enjoyed the show.

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2 replies »

  1. Do you have a place to stay? It’s worth noting that the only road in and out of PM from the northern resorts is often blocked by flooding in the mangroves, so you have to walk in and out of town. From the northern resorts, it can take from 30 minutes to an hour one way for that walk. If you rent a car, you have the same problem — one road, often flooded. We found our condo through VRBO on the Internet. Worth a luck. I loved it there.